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clippi
3rd February 2012, 03:01 PM
For you spotty fans tell me about them and in particular this stallion: August Skyhawk

Temprement
Attitude to work
Problems to watch out for

Thankyou

rowy
3rd February 2012, 03:36 PM
my boy is half welsh and then quarter appaloosa and 1/4 tb. He has an excellent temperment, so chilled and laid back and doesnt really spook at anything which im pretty sure he got from the appy genes.
Row has a really good work ethic but I know some appaloosa's can be quite stubborn.
conformation issues can be bad feet and built downhill but tend to be built quite stocky but I think it depends on the appaloosa as those from america are built quite like quarter horses where as those over here have less appaloosa blood in them (usually) and tend to be built finer.
Theres one at work which is knapstrupp x appaloosa and the guy training it doesnt like it because he thinks shes a bit thick lol she is quite slow at learning and can be a bit spooky. I love her though as she has such a sweet temperment, quite like Row she always wants to be around people and be cuddled :P She has a amazing trot but her canter has little to be desired though she is only rising 3 so this may improve.
Possibly have a look on the british appaloosa website for more info and I know a few people on here will have more info on appaloosas than me!

BEX101
3rd February 2012, 04:49 PM
I dont know Skyhawk myself but used his sire August Harrier on my mare twice (they have a website so look him up)
Harrier is about 15.1hh, great temperament etc. He doesnt look particulary fine but he has a lot of TB in his pedigree (its an aproved out cross for British Appaloosa's) and has a habit of throwing taller, leggier, sportier youngstyers on occasion.

I dont think you can really generalise about the breed itself. The BRITISH appaloosa isnt actally a fixed breed yet and the stud book is still open to non appy crosses. So some lines have a lot of TB. Arab and Quarter horse in them (aproved out crosses) and some lines used spotted breeding stock of unknown or non appy breeding such as Knapstruppers.
The purists would say appies should be closer to 15hh and more quarter horse in type, but you find a lot of the British appies taller and more sports horse built.

Are you thinking of buying something or breeding?

clippi
3rd February 2012, 05:12 PM
I'm looking at buying an Arab x Skyhawk foal (yet to be born), so want to know a little bit about the breed.

What do we think of an Arabx Appy?

I don't need to restrict myself to pure arab for endurance as i know with having mini clip i don't have the time to train to go beyond 30 mile rides. So was thinking of somehting that might have more scope to do other things. Arab purists don't shoot me down, Clip's good but not really made for jumping consistently

CityLights
3rd February 2012, 05:34 PM
conformation issues can be bad feet and built downhill but tend to be built quite stocky but I think it depends on the appaloosa as those from america are built quite like quarter horses where as those over here have less appaloosa blood in them (usually) and tend to be built finer.


ERM NO!
Feet wise appaloosas are incredible! Kizzies and infact all my appaloosas and part breeds have rock hard feet and none have needed much in the way of shoeing, so the feet are rarely an issue, yes some can be a touch on the downhill side but its purely genetics, if bred for western then yes they can be a touch downhill or flat in the topline as thats how you want a western horse to be, if you pick a foundation (US) stallion they are less downhill and a little heavier in the bone, and the hunter jumpers, or hunter under saddles are brilliant tall leggy athletic types, and then you get things like Amos who are mega and fit for any job and far from downhill naturally!

the british appaloosas are a stones throw from the Knabstrupper which is a hellish heavy carriage horse with spots so the american ones are finer in actual fact in term of bone, but have more natural muscle tone and bulk but incredible stamina and strength naturally, many of the 'british' line are infact more or less gone now, there ar very few left as the old breeders either no longer keep the stock to use for breeding or they have needed to import due to the small gene pool so yet again they have more american blood

the british lines, be careful with the foundation horses were knabs which were heavy common and ugly, and cold blooded, the american lines are bred differently and more focused for type and discapline so they can varry hugely in type size build and style, but you still end up with a very hardy strong willing and level headed horse,

arab x appaloosa ends up as a very nice cross i have seen quite a few and they are very popular with the endurace lot as is the pure bred,

Temprement is fab, they are friendly people orientated horses but they take tact, being an arab owner you should have plenty! you cannot bully or boss them they are far too intelligent for that but you get a very good working partnership and they are a horse that will give you the earth if you asked for it , very trainable and incredible stamina very natrual athletes and quick to get fit but hardy and generally really easy and cheap to keep

problem to look for is PSSM its on a very basic level a pre-disposition for azotoria if they do not advertise being PSSM free then you need to test or ask about it, it will hopefully be bred out as PSSM positive stallions cannot be liscenced and therefore you cant paper stock from them, if its a heavily QH line then you may also want to check for HYPP, and HERDA depending on the lines, although i had a HERDA positive QH and we didnt have much of an issue with him

BEX101
3rd February 2012, 06:16 PM
Just noticed you've also posted a thred asking about standardbreds and theit gaits...... i'm assuming for a similar reason to this thred.

Snippet of information - Some Appies ALSO have an extra gait called the Indian Shuffle.....

The early Appaloosas were known for the smooth riding gait that became known as the Indian Shuffle. Horses with this gait were often called "hundred mile a day horses", because the gait is easy on the rider and less tiring for the horse. It is closely related to the distinctive gait of the Peruvian Paso and Paso Fino (which share a common link with the Appaloosa to the early Spanish Jennet horses).

In the Indian shuffle, each foot hits the ground independently. The timing is not even, making it a broken four beat gait... 1-2--3-4, 1-2--3-4. This is because the time between hoof beats on the same side is shorter than the time between the next hoof beat coming on the opposite side.

The mechanics of the Indian Shuffle can be described as follows:

The right legs are on the ground and move back together.

The left legs are off the ground and move forward, with the rear leg just slightly ahead of the front.

As the left legs move forward, the right legs move back to the full extent of the stride.

The left rear leg strikes the ground just before the left front.

The right rear leg and then the right front leg leave the ground beginning the next sequence.

The Indian Shuffle is a lateral gait, since the legs on each side of the horse lift and move together. The trot on the other hand, is a diagonal gait, since the legs on opposite sides lift and move together. The trot is also a two beat gait, because each leg in a diagonal pair hits the ground at the same time... 1-2, 1-2, 1-2, 1-2, 1-2.

Some may say the Indian Shuffle resembles the Pace, which is also a lateral gait. But the Pace is a two beat gait, not the broken four beat gait of the true Shuffle.

A true Indian Shuffle consists of the horse moving two lateral sets of legs nearly, but not quite, in unison. The hind leg sets down an instant before the fore leg. In other words, it is a form of the stepping pace. What sets it apart from other stepping paces is that the hind leg literally shuffles as it sets down under the horse. This has a fabulous shock absorbing effect for the rider. Unlike many other kinds of horses that do a stepping pace, these horses generally will not 'square up' their gaits -- the shuffle is an entirely dominant genetic characteristic. Also unlike other pacey animals, Indian Shuffling horses tend to have an easy, wonderful canter, and a very lateral walk.

CityLights
3rd February 2012, 07:02 PM
never heard anyone explain the indian shuffle before but it sounds like what my old mare used to do sometimes more so on uneven terrain like in the field, always just thought she was a bit lame ish or needed her back doing,

BEX101
3rd February 2012, 07:25 PM
Got to admit i copied the explaination from somewhere else (far too much to remember) They did have an animated image showing how the shuffle works and i did think that some people would probably mistake it for the horse being lame.

rowy
3rd February 2012, 07:32 PM
ERM NO!
Feet wise appaloosas are incredible! Kizzies and infact all my appaloosas and part breeds have rock hard feet and none have needed much in the way of shoeing, so the feet are rarely an issue, yes some can be a touch on the downhill side but its purely genetics, if bred for western then yes they can be a touch downhill or flat in the topline as thats how you want a western horse to be, if you pick a foundation (US) stallion they are less downhill and a little heavier in the bone, and the hunter jumpers, or hunter under saddles are brilliant tall leggy athletic types, and then you get things like Amos who are mega and fit for any job and far from downhill naturally!



Really? Cos my farrier said it can be typical of the breed...
But when i say poor feet, i dont mean like weak footed, just a bit flat footed. Row is pretty flat and the farrier said its cos he's appy but I said he is half tb as well so it could be that and he said yeh it could be. Maybe its cos alot of appy in the UK has tb in it so may have spread the flat footed gene a bit.

CityLights
3rd February 2012, 08:33 PM
theres not much TB in the british lines at all, there is only really one stud that i can think of that have used a large amount of TB and thats the Capital lines, they are allowed to be but not much, i have not known an appaloosa with bad feet, they have nice feet and compared to things like Warmbloods yes a touch flatter but warmbloods are upright and boxy so its only a comparision against another breed anyway

the hind feet of the western bred ones are bred to be a little longer in the toe and flatter in the hoof but thats only in western bred ones as it helps them to slide, you dont want a horse with a short toe for reining they dig in too much, but you wont get much in the way of properly performance western bred appaloosas over here to notice the subtle diferences in the conformation

clippi
3rd February 2012, 08:48 PM
Wow. Thankyou for the wealth of information coming this way. It's really giving me something to think about.

Yes, the same reason I'm asking about Standardbreds. Trying to look at different options that may be suitable for my requirements