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Tiaki
7th November 2009, 08:02 PM
I haven't got a pic but I currently got a lovely horse in for schooling/sale production. Doesn't belong to me but would like your views on a value for him.

16.2hh Chestnut Irish TB Gelding, 6yrs old. Passported with Weatherbys. Has raced lightly but was basically too slow. 100% in all ways, good to shoe, catch, load, clip. 110% in the heaviest of traffic. Working well on the flat with lovely flowing paces. Jumps 3' for fun. Jumping well over coloured poles and rustic fences. Been to a couple of local shows and done CR, gone clear. Weaves a tiny amount when in a new location/out of routein but this fades as he settles. Very nice looking horse. lovely character. Not in the least bit bargy or pushy. Never kicks or bites. Lunges well and is great with other horses, both mares and geldings. worming and teeth up to date. Tack and rugs included. Showing good potential for eventing but is an easy enough ride for RC. Snaffle mouth, never pulls or gets strong. Sad sale due to change in lack of time to do him justice.

So that's the low down, what do you guys think??

xxx

cocopops
7th November 2009, 08:17 PM
I would say no more than 1500 for an ex racer that weaves. If he really is a jumper then get him out jumping a couple of BNs or BE intros in the spring and then the value will go up, but untill they are proven they really arent worth anything.

nic
7th November 2009, 10:02 PM
Depends on conformation too...he sounds nice ..and going just from the description Id say around 1500-2000
If he has good confo and a good attitude to work I cant see (with some comp experience, preferably affiliated) why he couldn't fetch a fair bit more.



Piccies please!!!!:D

helena
8th November 2009, 05:33 AM
Around 1000 max with the tack. The fact that he weaves and has raced, even lightly go against him. If he went to the sales he'd be a 500-600 horse, my mate has recently bought TB's for 240 (unusually cheap) from the sales and one for 600.

I'm a director of the TRC, and they have several horses in similar to him that the rehoming fee is 500 for, and that comes with their expert help and back up.
Obviously you will command a little more on a private sale and the tack will help.

Tiaki
8th November 2009, 12:17 PM
Will try and post a pic when I can. Need to get some current ones of him working.

His conformation is ok. He's a bit close behind but this is improving with correct work. He hasn't done *** all really for the last 8months or so so he is lacking muscle and top line.

He does work well on the flat and has a good jump. I find the main thing with him is that he takes a lot of riding, in the sense he is so blooming long he needs "keeping together" but when kept together goes very nicely.

He is still young and green but the potential is definitely there. He's a cracking horse, currently advertised at 1800. I think give him 6months - 12months of correct work and he'll be worth 2500 easy.

xxx

classic astra
8th November 2009, 12:55 PM
id say about 1200 as he is, and definately a 2000+ horse with the right work! but sounds like you've got a great start!

My Crazy Clan
8th November 2009, 01:21 PM
2k sounds like he could be a lovely horse.

Sasca
8th November 2009, 05:12 PM
i would happily advertise him at 2500 providing he is safe and the add was worded right.

I wouldn't say the weaving was a vice if its just at new locations, therefore i would leave it out of the yard. I would also leave out that he has been raced. Tell them after they have judged him as a riding horse. The advert is to get them to come so you want to talk about his conformation and his riding style. I would get him out if you can as well. Take him X-county and hunting if you can just to add on to the advert. When they have assessed him then tell them all about his weaving nicley and his race report but it will give people the wrong idea early on and thats not fair on him...

Safety is key. If he is snaffle mouthed, hacks alone and in company with good conformation and doesn't do anything wrong, then 2500 for me. If one of those isn't ticked then thats when the price gets severley reduced.

helena
9th November 2009, 09:14 AM
Sasca, if they weave, even a little bit you must include it in the advert, as a weaver is not classified as a sound horse, so if someone bought the horse and then found it weaved they can actually legally ask for their money back.

I think the fact that he has raced or even trained as a racer must also be included. If I went to see a horse and expected it to have been broken normally as a riding horse say aged 4, then found out it had actually trained as a racer from say 18 months I would be pretty annoyed as it affects the price hugely.

Sasca
9th November 2009, 09:25 AM
Im not saying dont mention it or let them buy without knowing all of it but after selling so many decent horses, the advert just needs to get peoples attention, even if its to get them to ring. Just getting into a decent and friendly conversation can put the horse into perspective. When they first ring, mention how he weaves and that he was raced but at least hearing it how it is and not assuming the advert is covering up things. If you mention something in an advert, it is assumed that it is 10 times worse in actual life.

I have never covered up/lied or deceived someone about the soundness or quirks of any horse and actually point them out if i think they haven't noticed them but you have to get into a conversation with potential buyers for them to get there barriers down and consider the horse.

I just think that the negatives can be explained in more detail over a friendly conversation when they realise you are not a dodgy *** from a trailer park!

helena
9th November 2009, 10:28 AM
I agree that getting people to ring and see that you are decent is a key thing, but legally as weaving is classified as an unsoundness you've got to include in the advert that they weave.
If you didn't and you told them over the phone there's only your word against theirs should there be some sort of problem and they try to return the horse to you. You've got to cover your own back when you're advertising anything.