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Catg
11th November 2009, 02:42 PM
Hi guys,

I've heard a number of you say that horses have better eye sight than us in the dark. I have a few questions to ask you on this:

Is it true that although they can see better in the dark than us they actually take longer to adjust to different lighting?

Also I used to know someone who had an Appy and she said they don't have very good eye sight in the dark. Is this true?

Thanks

Cat x

vels mum
11th November 2009, 03:01 PM
Not sure about the Appy's not having such good eye sight? I know albino's are sometimes blind, dont know if this is connected???

Vel thunders through my field on the hillin the dark which has big boulders in it, im always concerned he will fall over one but he never does, may just be luck or perhaps he can see them, I certainly cant when its dark.

I know Turks eyesight isnt what it used to be and could be why he spooks at things more now, horse communicator told me his eyesight wasnt great, also he sometimes stares at puddles like he cant make out what it is, also he has trouble judging distances, he sometimes leaps out his stable as if there is a great big step to get onto the ground even though its just a tiny step.

CityLights
11th November 2009, 04:34 PM
the Appy thing i think is ******** mine is totally fine in the dark but apaprently the few spot types have some kind of night blindness (mine is a non characteristic so might be why she is fine) but doing a lot with appaloosas some people hugely disagree and discredit it so im not sure

I think they have problems adjusting to different light and distingusing shadows and also colours they apparently only see black white and shades of yellow, whcih always made sense to me as my horse will always stop at the yellow fence the white fence and fecnes going into woods,

JJJ
18th November 2009, 12:04 PM
They can see well enough when cantering down the gallop at half six on a winter morning in the pitch black lol! Great fun!!

eeek
18th November 2009, 12:10 PM
I would say they have much better night vision than we do, and have never noticed them taking a long time to adjust to changing light. I often take Vinny out of his stable (which is lit) and walk him 2 minutes to his field in pitch black and he is absolutely fine. He strides ahead of me (sometimes I don't lead him) and waits at the gate. I'm sure he sees better than me, even seconds after leaving a lit stable.

XenaWarriorPrincess
18th November 2009, 12:39 PM
Horses have both monocular and binocular vision. Monocular is where a different image is seen with each eye and is a clearer image. Binocular is where both eyes see the same image straight ahead, this is impeded by the muzzle when the head is up.
only one field of vision can be used at a time which is often the cause of spooking as often when the image flips from one to the other the object can seem closer than it actually is and seems to 'jump' into their vision!!
The optimum distance away from something to get a clear image for a horse is 4ft, which is often why they will sometimes step back to look at something.

The light/dark thing comes from horses being used to sunrise and sunset. It takes them longer to respond to immediate light than it does for us. For example their eyes will take longer to adjust to a light being switched on in their stable than we do.

x

Catg
18th November 2009, 01:02 PM
Horses have both monocular and binocular vision. Monocular is where a different image is seen with each eye and is a clearer image. Binocular is where both eyes see the same image straight ahead, this is impeded by the muzzle when the head is up.
only one field of vision can be used at a time which is often the cause of spooking as often when the image flips from one to the other the object can seem closer than it actually is and seems to 'jump' into their vision!!
The optimum distance away from something to get a clear image for a horse is 4ft, which is often why they will sometimes step back to look at something.

The light/dark thing comes from horses being used to sunrise and sunset. It takes them longer to respond to immediate light than it does for us. For example their eyes will take longer to adjust to a light being switched on in their stable than we do.

x

Xena your last sentence is exactly what I had in mind when posting this but obviously I was interested in how easily they adjust from light to dark too.

When I go to the yard at night and turn the barn light on Zeb stands there blinking at me all blurry eyed, it's quite cute really and I just wondered how long it takes him to adjust.

XenaWarriorPrincess
18th November 2009, 06:14 PM
:) Glad those 8.30 equine science lectures could be of some use :lol:
xx