PDA

View Full Version : Machine for mucking out


Eleanor
11th September 2009, 09:57 AM
Hi everyone,

I’m doing a bit of market research for an equine product manufacturer. It would be a great help to us if you could take a minute or so to read the following and give us your views.

The machine concerned is electrically-powered and is designed to aid mucking out a shavings bed. There's no need to just skip out, within a maximum of 10 minutes, though often less, you can give your stable a full muck-out and provide your horse with a clean bed everyday. For those currently using straw, our product makes a shavings bed more affordable, allowing you to switch from a high-waste style of bedding.

For protection purposes, I cannot reveal the exact design. However, it is being marketed on the basis of:

1.It saves you time – Reduces mucking-out time by more than 50%.
2.It saves you money – We estimate that, through the machine’s effective separation of dirty bed from clean bed, you could save at least a bag of shavings per horse per week.
3.It saves you effort – The machine does all the work, which helps protect your back and makes the job much more preferable due to its lack of physical demand.
4.It is simple to use.
5.The separation system is thorough, much more so than if you were to do the work with a shavings fork.

The machine will retail at around £500. Due to the savings made on shavings, the product pays for itself but more importantly, you are relieved of a time-consuming task.

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Eleanor

gem
11th September 2009, 11:37 AM
Personally I wouldn't buy one purely because of the price. I actually quite enjoy mucking out and it's excellent exercise. Also, £500 would pay for around 4 months livery. I'd imagine anyone on even a vague budget would prefer just to take the time (half an hour max?) to muck out themselves and save the money. I'd think people with more to spend are maybe more likely to put their horses on full livery so they wouldn't have to do anything themselves.

I could see it being a good investment though if someone had a couple of horses and didn't have the time to muck out. Full livery would get expensive with more than one horse so then the £500 wouldn't seem like too much of an expense in comparison.

Bay Chaos
11th September 2009, 12:19 PM
I wouldn't buy one, as my gee's are all on rubber mats with a thin layer of megazorb. A full muck out takes 5 minutes.

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 12:39 PM
well i'd be quite interested in something like that if it really did what it says it does...2 of my horses stay out almost all year but there are times when all come in during really bad weather so having 6 to muck out, anything that saves me some time would be a bonus and give me more time to spend with the horses, the initial layout is quite expensive but like you say, it would pay for itself after a while... interesting concept.

Eleanor
11th September 2009, 12:50 PM
well i'd be quite interested in something like that if it really did what it says it does...2 of my horses stay out almost all year but there are times when all come in during really bad weather so having 6 to muck out, anything that saves me some time would be a bonus and give me more time to spend with the horses, the initial layout is quite expensive but like you say, it would pay for itself after a while... interesting concept.

Thank you, that's great to hear. We're currently developing a DVD demo so I'll let you know as soon as it's available for viewing.

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 01:13 PM
Em, i agree with you about enjoying mucking out, i do like doing it too and i like the thought of everything being traditional but i do have really busy days sometimes and it would be nice to have that little extra help if and when i needed it, i think its a very personal choice, im not saying i WOULD go with something like that but i'd definitely be interested to see how it worked

just one thought though, if livery yards used them i wonder if the livery charges would go down as they would be saving time.. i doubt it lol

xx

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 01:14 PM
good questions Celina

Eleanor
11th September 2009, 01:22 PM
Reminds me of the film IRobot with Will Smith in it BC!

Another though it if broke down, where would be send it? Manafacturers or local mechanic place? umm There any other bits and bobs that go with this item (Im visualing it in a similar way to a hoover?) that either comes with it, or anythig we have to purchase seperately?

After a certain period of time would we need to replace parts of this product?

How does it sort through and differentiate between clean and dirty shavings?

Where are you wishing to sell your product? Internet? tack shops? Or through company website?

How big it this product? would it fit nicely in a fairly small space like a shavings fork/broom?

The more I think about it, the more I am thinking it isn't as good idea as it first sounded. Sorry for the 101 questions btw :lol:



It is a simple design with only 2 elements that could possibly break down, though due to their nature, this is highly unlikely. Should the event arise, the manufacturer would repair on site.
There would be no need to purchase anything seperately, the machine would arrive complete.
No parts would need replacing, though infrequent cleaning of one part would be recommended. I'm sorry to be a bit vague, the machine is patent pending.
As far as advertising is concerned, we would be pursuing all avenues.
The product is 60cm wide (24") and 89cm long (35").

Thanks for the questions, all are welcome and much appreciated.

Eleanor
11th September 2009, 01:34 PM
So Im presuming you will have manafacture repair people dotted around the country? If not what kind of call out charge would be made?

Are you selling to UK only? or England (plus isle of wight/man etc)/Scotland (Including shetlands isle)/wales and Ireland (all of it?)

I understand it is going through testing, however I am findin it hard to understand how exactly this product will work, or having trouble visualising the product working.

For the price, it seems I could easily buy myself more than enough shavings forks, wheelbarrows and brooms to last me a life time and still that wouldn't come to £500.

The solutions to all of your above queries are being finalised at the moment. With regards to seeing the product in action, we are currently developing a DVD demo.

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 01:35 PM
Em, yes i can see both sides of it to, but for me it wouldnt be something that enabled me to be quicker and thus spend less time with my horses, it would enable me (possibly) to spend MORE time with them... if i saved say, an hour a day then ok, thats not a huge amount of saved time but its still some saved time... i can get other people to help out sometimes but then surely thats the same as having a machine to help, the end result is the same... and theres also the times when theres no one available to help out... i still think its a very personal choice .. it could be said that people who have their horses on full livery are lazy and dont have the whole "hands on" thing with their horses but then again its down to personal choice...

btw.. im NOT knocking anyone who has full livery, im just using it as an example...

yes, lives are different these days and people are a lot busier but sometimes a little extra help is nice, i have a hoover and dont sweep my floor by hand so maybe its a similar thing..

not being flippant, its just my opinion.
xx

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 01:49 PM
yep i see where yr coming from but i still would be interested to see how it worked...

in an ideal world we would all work less hours, have less stresses and spend more time with our kids and animals and yes, some people could utilise their time better but some days i really do run out of time.. take yesterday for example, i got trodden on, hurt my hand, got eaten by ants, my farrier was late so i was back and forth with the horses and had to take a goose to the vet, go to my daughters collage induction, take the car in for some repairs, unload 100 bales of hay and straw plus all the other things i usually do and none of them things could have been done any other day this week due to hay man and farrier being busy so yes, yesterday a little help would have been great lol :cheekywink:

whereas today, im sat on my bum yakking on here ...

xx

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 01:50 PM
Celina... get a car lol

CDR
11th September 2009, 01:58 PM
If it was more like £100 I might consider it but for that price I'd rather do it myself. Sorry!

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 02:00 PM
I have a young child but unfortunately shes growing up and wont allow me to shove her up the chimney any more.. darn kids ... :cheekywink:

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 02:08 PM
oh bum.. get a bike then...

xx

CityLights
11th September 2009, 07:39 PM
Takes me less than ten minuets to muck out most horses anyway so it wouldnt save any time

Thingamyjig
11th September 2009, 08:25 PM
yr lucky then arnt you... Ziggy, Lulu and Star completely trash their stables, id like to see you much them out in ten minutes lol

My Crazy Clan
11th September 2009, 09:39 PM
I love mucking out, its part of owning a horse.

Although I would LOVE one of thoughs hoover type quad-bikes that suck up the poo in the field.

Teej
11th September 2009, 09:47 PM
I would rather spend time with my horses than muck out in all honesty. Mucking out takes me ages as I am too much of a perfectionist:rolleyes:

The problem is, I love chocolate and HAVE to eat it... when I feel like :D! So if I 'employed' a machine to muck out for me, I would have to stop eating chocolate as the machine would take over a big part of my fitness regime ! :lol:

torgrosset
12th September 2009, 08:50 AM
I can't understand how it'd work.
I can see how it'd know there is a poo, but how would it know the difference between wet/soiled/dirty shavings and clean??????